About

Zooscope — The Animals in Film Archive is a resource about the presence of animals in the history of film. Each post includes information and analysis about the presence and meaning of animals in a film. Users can navigate by the categories and tags found at the bottom of each page to filter the archive by film genre or by the presence of specific animals or aspects of human-animal relations in the films.

Animals have played a crucial role in the development of film as an artistic medium, from the literal use of animal products in film stock to the capturing of animal movement as a driver of stop-motion, wide-screen and CGI film technology. In terms of content and form, the wish to picture animals’ lives, whether naturalistically or playfully, has led to the establishment of key genres such as wildlife film and animation. ZooScope looks at and beyond these major aspects of animals in film, and entries can consider, inter alia: animals’ role in film genres and styles from arthouse to documentary to horror; the range of literal and symbolic ways animals appear in film; animals in the film star-system; animal lives and the ethics of film-making; adaptation and the different challenges of filmic and literary representation of animals.

tuoslogo_rgb_loZooScope is a collaborative research project: from its first year (2013) every student on No Animals Were Harmed in the Making of this Module (a 3rd Year Undergraduate Course designed by Robert McKay at the University of Sheffield) will contribute to the development of ZooScope by researching and writing an archive entry on a film.  I.T. development and continued support has been provided by Jamie Lepiorz.

If any site users are interested in contributing to the ZooScope archive project, please get in touch.

http://www.shef.ac.uk/english/people/mckay

http://www.shef.ac.uk/english/people/lepiorz

Creative Commons License
ZooScope: The Animals in Film Archive by The University of Sheffield is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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